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“Smart devices aren’t safe”: We spoke to a top security leader and CEO about hackers

Are your smart devices safe? We asked a top security leader and CEO how your personal wealth and business could be under threat, without you even realising.

Now a study from Bullguard, a leading Internet Security and Antivirus software company, has found that one in five people are reluctant to buy smart devices. Why? Because of fears of hacking and cyber security.

Then a third of British people surveyed said that they don’t think device manufacturers are doing enough to educate their customers about the implications of not securing connected devices.

Does this affect you? Yes it does

We asked the CEO of BullGuard what he thinks of this issue and why millions of us are at risk without even knowing.

security leader - Compelo

Paul Lipman, the CEO of BullGuard told Compelo: “Many smart connected devices have no security protection. We’ve already seen how one attack that used thousands of hacked smart devices took down leading internet services in the US including Netflix and Twitter. Hacks on the smart home could have far more damaging consequences.”

Are you in these percentages?

Over a third of us don’t regularly update or change our passwords for our routers.

Then, shockingly, 91 per cent of those asked stated that they are concerned hackers could monitor their every move. Three in five people worry that hackers can watch or listen their children through baby monitors or web cams.

“People have good reason to be concerned about hackers. Smart devices aren’t safe. A hacked smart camera, for example, could easily lead to stalking. The victim wouldn’t even know anything about it,” Lipman told us.

Lipman added: “Many IoT device manufacturers rarely prioritise security. Then when they do, it can be too complex for the average consumer to understand. When you buy a car, you don’t expect to twiddle with the engine to get it started, so why should you be expected to know how to apply updates to your smart devices to keep them running securely?”

Enjoy reading this feature with a top security leader? Then read more content like this here –

“The internet is a powder keg waiting to explode” – FBI security expert Frank Abagnale on global cyber attacks

80% of top business owners aren’t afraid of hackers: We spoke to experts

The Dark Web: Everyone uses it, including criminals