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  • Cosmetic puts best foot forward

    Matthew Rogerson writes: Times are certainly changing, with the pace of the New Year accelerating for the packaging industry. Once upon a time, brand-owners could take time to reflect on the previous year, gradually preparing their next steps, but businesses that do so may find themselves lagging behind packaging’s go-getters.

  • The drive to do better

    Matthew Rogerson writes: As we start 2018, we seem to be moving at a more frantic pace than that of the previous year. Yet, it is the perfect time to take the time to consider some of the key trends and market developments that may occur over the next 12 months.

  • Understanding New

    Matthew Rogerson writes: Welcome, readers, to our final edition of Packaging Today for 2017, and it has certainly been an incredibly busy year. With Interpack, Labelexpo Europe, Packaging Innovations, IPEX, PPMA and others all seeing record-breaking attendance figures and product launches, I am sure many of us will be grateful for the welcome respite of Christmas and New Year. It is important to stay with the new part of New Year, briefly as there has been an almighty struggle in recent years when it comes to new; new tastes, packaging, flavours, ingredients, health benefits and engagement have all appeared across innovation and major packaging changes in 2017. However, two of the most fundamental drivers of consumer behaviour remain nostalgia and heritage or story telling, neither of which are present in an absolutely brand new product or package.

  • Making it count

    Matthew Rogerson writes: 2017 seems to have flown by, and despite the apparently unrelenting pace of bad news and various scandals that are breaking out across the world, in the packaging industry the main focus seems to be on the final quarter and the run up to Christmas.

  • Educate, engage and enforce

    Matthew Rogerson writes: With the recent close of a chock-a-block and outstanding Labelexpo Europe, label print and coating were high on the agenda of attendees and exhibitors. With the upcoming IPEX show print is understandably at the forefront of many converters’ minds. After all, it is essentially the engine that drives the brand message into consumers’ hearts and minds. A simple box – be it corrugated or carton – that looks a bit weathered will not cause much consternation for most, as it looks the part it is playing , a no-nonsense shipping solution that protects goods in transit. However, an ink-smudged label, a bar code that does not scan or a QR code that does not read on a smartphone will immediately cause customers to steer clear – they don’t trust the product, even if there is nothing wrong with the product inside. It is thought of as ‘damaged’.

  • Image is everything

    Matthew Rogerson writes: As we gear up for the second half of the year, one area that remains a constant in the world of packaging is the importance of image. Beauty might be in the eye of the beholder but looking good leads to feeling great, and social media’s dominance means it is no longer enough to simply look good. Beauty seemingly counts for naught unless your followers are able to see it.

  • Collaboration is Key

    Matthew Rogerson writes: The converting industry feels to be in a little bit of a holding pattern as we enter summer holidays, which given the speed with which we have arrived in July juxtaposed with absolute halt of activity that is likely to occur in the next couple of weeks is particularly strange to those of us used to the flexibility, adaptability and most of all the precision with which our manufacturing lives are governed. It is of particular interest as we start to concentrate on the upcoming European Labelexpo which has already shown a staggering amount of innovation and new proposed product launches, and looks set to be one of the best shows yet.

  • Packed with promise

    Matthew Rogerson writes: Packaging gets rough treatment. This is true literally as it goes from manufacture , through supply chains in which it is bounced, prodded, dropped, thrown and generally abused until it finally arrives on a shelf where it can finally be taken home by a consumer. Packaging has to not only weather this storm but must navigate through the murky waters of consumer needs where it will need to deliver the protection and performance promised by the brand it represents and yet remain unobtrusive in the customers’ home until called upon to deliver its product and then be disposed of.