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NeuroMetrix presents preliminary study results of Quell wearable pain relief device

Health care firm NeuroMetrix has presented the preliminary results from a clinical study of the Quell wearable pain relief device in subjects with chronic pain.

Quell, which uses wearable intensive nerve stimulation (WINS) technology, is an easy-to-use and over-the-counter device for relief of chronic pain.

The firm’s study abstract "Treatment of Chronic Pain with a Novel Wearable Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator" has been accepted for poster presentation at the PAINWeek 2015 Scientific Sessions in Las Vegas, which will be held from 8 to 12 September.

NeuroMetrix president and CEO Dr Shai Gozani said: "We are pleased with these results. They represent the first formal evaluation of self-administered wearable intensive nerve stimulation.

"The primary outcome measure was impressive with 81% of subject’s rating Quell therapy as improving their chronic pain and overall health."

The open-label, single-arm, flexible dosing and 60-day trial assessed Quell for treatment of chronic pain.

It included 88 subjects with average age of 56 years and 45% were female. The subjects were instructed to self-administer Quell daily to manage pain and were not given special instruction on the device.

They were not contacted during the 60-day study period and not asked to alter their analgesic medications or pain treatments.

According to the firm, the primary outcome measure was the subject’s self-rated change in their chronic pain and overall health using a five-point patient global impression of change (PGIC) scale.

The study’s secondary outcome measures were change in use of pain medications and selected pain intensity, pain relief, and pain interference domains from the brief pain inventory.