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First patients in Americas treated with INFINI

Infini is a next generation intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery system manufactured by MASEP. It is characterized by its speed during treatment, high level of accuracy and its increased efficiency because of the use of only 30 cobalt sources (energy necessary for radiation emission) compared to 192 used by other machines.

Infini is a next generation intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery system manufactured by MASEP. It is characterized by its speed during treatment, high level of accuracy and its increased efficiency because of the use of only 30 cobalt sources (energy necessary for radiation emission) compared to 192 used by other machines.

Infini is approved by the FDA and has received all international accreditations for quality assurance granted by the industry. Classified as a "masterpiece," it received Germany’s IF Design award for best medical design.

Radiosurgery is a medical procedure in which a targeted area of the brain is destroyed, obliterated or its function modified in order to improve or save the lives of patients with brain tumors (primary or metastases), arteriovenous malformations or any other functional neurological disorder.

It focuses hundreds of weak energy beams on a precise focal point where their sum total creates a large amount of energy. The process is considered minimally invasive in neurosurgery and does not require anesthesia, it is not necessary to open the cranium, and it is usually performed as an outpatient procedure.

"We have successfully treated the first 50 patients with Infini in the Americas, with surprising results for illnesses which we simply did not have a way to treat previously," said Dr. Eduardo Lovo, neurosurgeon and Director of High-Precision Radiosurgery Unit at the International Cancer Center in El Salvador, Central America.

"The machine is not only fully automated which has allowed us to develop highly complex plans, but also its greater efficiency and lower cost have made its introduction possible in countries such as ours with major social and economic challenges," said Lovo.