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Bausch & Lomb Launches Crystalens AO Lens

To improve retinal image quality of distance and intermediate vision

Bausch & Lomb has launched the Crystalens Aspheric Optic (AO), the aberration-free accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) with aspheric optics, to cataract surgeons worldwide. The launch follows the recent FDA approval of this new surgical product. The Crystalens AO is combined with the Crystalens HD and the Crystalens Five-0.

The Crystalens AO has prolate aspheric surfaces and is designed to be free of spherical aberration. It is designed to improve retinal image quality without compromising depth of field and therefore provides greater quality of distance and intermediate vision, said the company

Bausch & Lomb claims that Crystalens is the only FDA-approved accommodating intraocular lens. Unlike a standard cataract replacement lens, Crystalens is designed to not only eliminate a patient’s cataract but to provide a full range of vision so that the patient can see near, far and everywhere in between.

The Crystalens AO is comprised of proprietary biosil silicone and has a thin and uninterrupted barrier edge. It will be inserted using the CI-28 injector in a controlled manner through an un-enlarged phaco incision, which is a routine requirement in cataract surgical procedure. The Crystalens AO worldwide launch is expected to accelerate through the first quarter of 2010.

Andy Corley, global president of Surgical at Bausch & Lomb, said: “The Crystalens AO has zero spherical aberration, and the combination of the Crystalens platform and AO optics work together to enhance depth of field.”

Jay Pepose of the Pepose Vision Institute at St. Louis, said: “The Crystalens AO provides patients an opportunity to enjoy improved post-operative vision through an increase in contrast sensitivity due to the absence of spherical and higher order aberrations. This, along with the general consensus that the best technology for treatment of presbyopic patients is an accommodating lens, will encourage many surgeons to adopt this new product.”