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Wärtsilä-built Manga LNG terminal unloads first LNG shipment

The Tornio Manga liquefied natural gas (LNG) receiving terminal, which has been built by Wärtsilä in Röyttä, Tornio in Northern Finland, has achieved the unloading of the first shipment of LNG.

The shipment contained 15,000 cubic meters of LNG, which is supplied by the Skangas-operated Coral Energy time-chartered LNG carrier, marking the commissioning phase of the project.

The Coral Energy medium-size LNG carrier vessel is powered by one Wärtsilä 50DF and two Wärtsilä 20DF eco-friendly dual-fuel engines.

Wärtsilä said that the LNG from the terminal will be used to provide clean burning energy for local and regional industries in Northern Finland, Sweden and Norway.

In addition to helping in reducing CO2 footprint of the region’s industrial operations, the terminal will provide bunkering for LNG fuelled ships.

The Manga LNG terminal project is owned by a joint venture (JV) company, known as Manga LNG Oy, which is owned by Outokumpu Group, Svenskt Stål (SSAB), Skangass and EPV Energy.

Manga LNG Oy CEO Mika Kolehmainen said: “The arrival and unloading of the first delivery of LNG at the new terminal marks an important new step for energy usage by local industries and shipping.”

Wärtsilä said that the next LNG shipment at the terminal is scheduled at the beginning of 2018. The terminal is expected to receive LNG deliveries at two-week intervals when fully operational.

According to Wärtsilä, the terminal is expected to diversify the gas and fuel markets of the Northern region by providing more environmentally friendly and inexpensive alternative to the Northern industry, energy production and maritime transport.


Image: The Tornio Manga LNG terminal will receive LNG deliveries at two-week intervals when fully operational. Photo: courtesy of Wärtsilä.